We've been listening, thinking, and writing.

On November 17th (Monday) at 10am EST, the RedBag Insight team will be hosting a webinar to go over the four recent publications and the insights we are seeing. Please join us for an interesting hour of discussion, insight and acumen. We will send out an agenda in the week to come.

 RSVP for Webinar 

RSVP for Webinar 

If as you read these four insights, you have questions or suggestions, please send them to us ahead of time to info@redbaginsight.com. We will also have time for live questions on the 17th.


Here's our most recent publication and a summary of the three others we shared in recent months. We've made it even easier for you to read - only one click away..

Our most recent publications:

Brain Based Computing: The Next Computer Revolution 
Scientists are beginning to use evolutionary processes to create a computing revolution. The current transistor based computing architecture has some apparent limits in speed and power because of what might be the greatest challenge to current computer architecture: language sequencing. Some researchers in artificial intelligence (AI), who have heretofore sought to mimic human intelligence using the computational machines, have now switched metaphors from the machine-based model to a brain-based model. As a result of that shift, they are making rapid progress in creating a new computing architecture taking place around areas of human mental capabilities: Brain, Thought, Intelligence and Consciousness.

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 Click to read full issue

Click to read full issue

Dealing with Surveillance and Terrorism: What Nature Can Teach Us

The risks of surveillance and the dangers of terrorist attacks have become part of the fabric of American society the past several years. A look into how elk and deer responded to the reintroduction of grey wolves in Yellowstone National Park will provide some perspective into how terrorism has altered Americans’ behavior and whether recent revelations about the government’s response to terrorism are likely to provoke additional changes.

 Click here to read full issue

Click here to read full issue

China Has a Brand Strategy, Do You? 

Revlon announced back in December that it was leaving China and letting go of 1,100 staff, including 940 beauty advisers. Bosideng, a Chinese company unknown to most Western investors, built the most expensive fashion retail store in London in 2012, at a cost of over £30 million. Meanwhile, in January, Nu Skin Enterprises learned that the Chinese government would investigate its operations, after a report in the state-run People’s Daily claimed that the skin-care and nutrition company operated as a “Suspected illegal pyramid scheme.” Are any of these related?Evidence is mounting that China has a very specific consumer brand strategy, and is intentionally creating challenges for foreign brands while benefits accrue to indigenous companies. How will foreign companies decide to respond?

 Click to read full issue

Click to read full issue

What’s Wrong With Kids Today? 

Six years after the Great Recession started, the economic fortunes of young adults continue to lag behind those of society overall. These young adults’ educations do not fit employer needs; their salaries are actually decreasing; their financial wherewithal is contracting; and their options for the future have not opened up. As a result, they are creating a new set of Operational Priorities that are making young adults harbingers of where society as a whole is headed.

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 Click to read full issue

Click to read full issue

The World’s Waistline Expands…Except in the US 

In the US, a combination of Americans’ focus on living healthier lifestyles and an ongoing social and political conversation about obesity has helped the US adult obesity rate to finally reach a plateau. At the same time, many emerging markets with a growing middle are needing to deal with the realizations that come with consuming more calories and leading a more sedentary lifestyle. Opportunities and risks are large (and growing).

 Click to read full issue

Click to read full issue

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